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ZNO Format - How to convert ....

 
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tellmewhy
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PostPosted: 01/07/2007 09:18:20    Post subject: ZNO Format - How to convert .... Reply with quote

What is ZNO format ?

ZNO file is a Zinio Reader Magazine. Zinio is a company providing digital magazine distribution for popular magazines in a digital format.
Opens with Zinio Reader

What is the Zinio Reader ?




The Zinio Reader is software that replicates printed magazines or newspapers from cover to cover on any Zinio-integrated electronic device allowing readers to see a two-page view as though the magazine were open and lying flat. The cursor changes as to its location on the page. The menus at the top and bottom provide additional functions such as a table of contents; articles listed with links; and a tool so users can add notes, highlight text, words or phrases and print pages. The same electronic file that goes to the printer can also be used with the Zinio Reader, saving the client time and money. "IDEO's multidisciplinary approach to research is clearly evident in their straightforward solution. This unobtrusive interface gives the reader the best of the print and digital worlds." -Julie Heard, IDSA, Principal, Mixer* Group.

Download Zinio Reader

A good review found at wap.org
Quote:
One of the things that I don’t like about the Zinio system is its approach to Digital Rights Management (DRM). Zinio requires you to download a magazine on each machine that you want to use to read it. You cannot copy it over a LAN or burn it to a CD to read it on other machines (although you can download it up to three times). At 15+MB per magazine that takes quite a while on a dial-up connection.


How to convert ZNO to PDF :
(This is a work around i found on internet)

  1. Get Adobe Acrobat Professional (Not Reader).
  2. Make sure the Adobe PDF printer is NOT the default printer. This is imperative to the ripping process.
  3. Starting with the first page (cover), hit Ctrl+P in Zinio.
  4. Select Adobe PDF from the printer drop-down menu.
  5. Print the page and save in some sequential order, for example 001.pdf
  6. Repeat for each page (excluding advertisement pages) of the magazine.
  7. Open Adobe Acrobat.
  8. Go to File --> Create PDF --> From Multiple Files…
  9. Click Browse, go to directory where you saved the printed PDFs.
  10. Select all the files (click on the first one, hold down shift and click on the last one)
  11. Make sure files are arranged in order
  12. Create PDF

Two other methods to "convert" ZNO documents :

  • Use the program called SNAGIT to capture the Screen in Zinio and then save to pdf. It works great and no watermarks!
  • Use Hypersnap to capture Zinio documents. The problem, the captured document consists entirely of images, which means :

    1. It's very big.
    2. It doesn't allow any cut&paste of text content within the document.

Directly printing or converting or very difficult (not to say impossible).
Let me phrase two user reactions on a forum while i searched :
The first one is about "DRM protection" they seem to use.
Quote:
I don't think there is a way to convert the format due to its heavy DRM restrictions: Zinio uses DRM technology by ContentGuard, who is also the evil brain behind DRM deployment for all other types of digital content or services.

The second one is about "Watermark" using their printfunction (printing to PDF).
Quote:
You simply open up your zno and "save it as PDF" in you printer dialog.
I also tried the latest version (you only get it with when registered to the side) and printing ist still on, but you get your registration watermarked on every page.


Last edited by tellmewhy on 23/07/2007 04:00:12; edited 2 times in total
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Publicité






PostPosted: 01/07/2007 09:18:20    Post subject: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
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tellmewhy
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PostPosted: 01/07/2007 09:24:01    Post subject: ZNO - Review Reply with quote



When I registered my new G4 iBook last week I received a nice E-mail from Apple with a nice gift—one free year of Macworld magazine, in either traditional or electronic format published by Zinio (www.zinio.com). Since I just renewed my print subscription I decided to try the electronic version, and here is my first impression of it.



Zinio Reader (Panther version, 1.4.3) is a free 6.4 megabyte download that allows you to download and read the electronic magazines. Once you download a magazine and open it in the reader it behaves similarly to a paper magazine. The display shows two facing pages (or just the cover when you first open a new magazine). This results in text that is a little too small for me to read (on a 12" iBook at least) but the default mouse click action is to zoom in on an area of interest. The amount of zoom can be adjusted from zooming in from two pages wide to one page wide, to as large a zoom as from the two-page width to one third of a page in width. Clicking along the side of a page causes the page to flip, with or without animation. Like Adobe Acrobat Reader, moving around in a zoomed in page is as simple as clicking and dragging the page. In addition to the smart mouse actions, there are also navigation buttons along the bottom of the reader. The reader also can be navigated by keyboard shortcuts. In all, it is an easy to use program that works well on my 800 MHz iBook with 256M RAM.



Quote:
The cover art for an electronic magazine isn’t particularly inspiring. What works in print doesn’t necessarily work electronically.


One of the things that I don’t like about the Zinio system is its approach to Digital Rights Management (DRM). Zinio requires you to download a magazine on each machine that you want to use to read it. You cannot copy it over a LAN or burn it to a CD to read it on other machines (although you can download it up to three times). At 15+MB per magazine that takes quite a while on a dial-up connection. I would be much happier with the iTunes DRM method where one download can be shared across three computers. Another nit to pick is the cost—I would like to see a discounted subscription rate for those of us who already subscribe to the printed magazine. I think $5 or so per year to be able to download an electronic version of what I already am paying for would be great. But both of these are small issues in an overall good package.



Quote:
The Zinio Reader interface has icons at the top for zooming in, printing, searching, flipping pages, etc. At the bottom is a tool for rapidly “flipping” through electronic documents.

Magazine selection is fairly decent, with about 30 or so different titles being offered, including Macworld and the new, digital-only, Mac Developer Journal. Also, the Zinio Web site has numerous sample issues of these magazines that you can download. The Mac Developer Journal bears special mention. It is a new, electronic-only magazine that has embedded video and other “Rich Media” features. You can either purchase a subscription to a magazine or buy single issues.

The bottom line is that I really like the Zinio reader as a complement to the printed magazine. It is convenient to use and has an intuitive interface. The only drawbacks that I see are the DRM, and the cost for subscribing to both versions of a magazine. Now, if they would only start offering archives in the Zinio format I could get rid of the boxes of old magazines that I have stacked in my basement!
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tellmewhy
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PostPosted: 05/07/2007 04:15:01    Post subject: ZNO Format - How to convert .... Reply with quote

As an alternative for the use of Acrobat (the last 6 points),
See the quote, you can use a free PDF merger tool.
Quote:

  1. Open Adobe Acrobat.
  2. Go to File --> Create PDF --> From Multiple Files…
  3. Click Browse, go to directory where you saved the printed PDFs.
  4. Select all the files (click on the first one, hold down shift and click on the last one)
  5. Make sure files are arranged in order
  6. Create PDF


Something like PDF Split and Merge Ver. 0.6 sr 3.

Application info :

Application name: PDF Split and Merge
Application name: 0.6 sr 3
Language: Java(TM) 2 SDK, Standard Edition, Version 1.4.2
Author: Andrea Vacondio
Build date: 16/03/2007
Website: http://pdfsam.sourceforge.net

What is PDF Split and Merge Ver. 0.6 sr 3 ?

pdfsam is an open source tool (GPL license) designed to handle pdf files. It requiers a Java Virtual Machine 1.4.2 or higher and it’s released in 2 versions, basic and enhanced.

pdfsam basic:

A simple tool designed to split and merge pdf files. With it’s simple and intuitive interface you can:

  • split your pdf documents (into chapters, single pages, etc.).
  • merge many pdf documents or subsections of them.
  • exctract sections of your document into a single pdf document.

pdfsam enhanced:

This is the enhanced version of pdfsam. In this version you’ll find all the basic features plus:

  • encrypt your pdf files (RC40 bits, RC128 bits, AES128 bits) and set permissions on them.
  • add a pdf cover or footer (or both) to your pdf documents.
  • mix alternate pages taken from two pdf documents in straight or reverse order into a single document.
  • save and load your environment to automatize your recurrent jobs.
  • manage pdfsam settings and set an environment to load at start up.
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tellmewhy
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PostPosted: 05/07/2007 19:57:36    Post subject: Informal Review: Zinio Reader Reply with quote

Informal Review: Zinio Reader

I was lucky enough to get in on a free 1 year subscription to PC Magazine a couple months ago. I stopped buying it years ago because it was becoming so Internet-centric and home-user oriented that it lost the power-user edge it had when PCs weren't as popular in the pre-$20-ISP age. I still read it now and then, and the columns from Bill Machrone and especially John C. Dvorak still are almost worth the cover price alone. Sadly, when I got to the free subscription offer, all the print-edition giveaways were gone, so I had to accept the subscription in digital format only. I figured, "well, it's still PCMag, and still free, so why not." I already have a print edition subscription to eWeek, and grab the PDF versions when I need an article and I've already tossed the aging paper version. I was not-too-pleasantly surprised to see PC Magazine's digital edition isn't in PDF, but in a format from a company called Zinio for their proprietary Zinio Reader. Frankly, Adobe's PDF would have been a far better choice for many reasons. Acrobat even does DRM, which seems to be the main point of using Zinio's software.
Click the link for my informal review on the app.



I'll start with the good points, as it won't take long. There's a downloader app that receives the magazines you're subscribed to, and stores them in a special subfolder in your My Documents folder. This is nice, because it's easier to store digital copies than paper copies. You can launch the downloader separately or from within the Reader app. That's handy. There's a feature to highlight areas of the pages, and also a feature to make notes and annotations that are stored from session to session, and unlike paper notes or highlighters, these can be removed perfectly. There's also the ability to share a copy of the magazine with a few friends. You click the button, and your browser opens to a page where you input their email address so a copy of the magazine can be made available to them. This requires they download the reader, though, so that the DRM features will still be in effect.

Now for the rest of the app. First, while the .zno files aren't PDFs, Zinio license Adobe's PDF technology for the core of their application. However, if I were Adobe, I wouldn't brag about that. Zinio managed to take the PDF format to new lows.

First, the app is horribly slow. It actually takes more than a second to go to the next page. Now, this could be overcome with some smarter caching technology. I know they're using some caching, because if you click back a page, it's near instant, and if you then click forward again to the page you just had loaded, it's also very fast. Simply caching the next page while the user is loading this one would solve the molasses-like page turning problem.

Zooming in or out on a page is just as slow. Zoom in, the whole page has to redraw as though from scratch, still taking over a second. Zoom out, same thing. Grab the page and pan in any direction, same thing. Adobe Acrobat Reader is so much faster, I can't even begin to compare them. on this same system, it's nearly instant when flipping pages, and the pages are redrawn as I pan, I don't have to stop panning to let the app redraw, as in the Zinio Reader. And god help you if you ALT-TAB out of the app, and then back in. It'll take about two full seconds to redraw the screen.

And while we're talking about switching apps, you'll have to use ALT-TAB as the reader maximizes itself full-screen, blocking access to the taskbar, even if your taskbar is set to Autohide (as mine is). Further, the Maximize/Restore button doesn't actually do anything, despite being there and changing state when you click it. Why bother putting it there then? This is not a beta or preview version, the app claims to be version 1.6, and I found references to older versions on the web, so they didn't skip versions 1.0 through 1.5.


You know those cardboard inserts in magazine offering subscriptions to the publication, or from advertisers? They're still here, along with those annoying foldouts. I was stunned at this. What's worse, is they act like pages, meaning you can't just click them away or move them, you have to "turn" the page to see the content they obscure, and since it's not paper, you can't tear it out (see first comment). To the right here you can see an Earthlink ad card in two shots. In the first, it is on the right side, and the next picture shows after "turning" the page. And yes, it took just as long to render this turned page as it does a full page. And here are two more, this one a subscription ad card for a new Ziff Davis magazine called "Sync". Strangely enough, I somehow managed to get a copy of it in the mail, it's just another of the sexy-gadget magazines that frankly are done better by the dozens of websites out there.









It's even worse for multi-page inserts. Those are usually affixed to a page with some rubber cement, so you can peel it out, then remove the rubber cement. Not so here, obviously, and you have to flip through multiple pages, not just one. It's awful.

while most ads are just as tame as any print ad, they have abuse potential. Ads can embed other media, such as Flash. With such a bombardment of annoying ads on the web, and magazines being more ad than content to start with anymore (as he noticed too), I really don't need magazine ads gesticulating at me too. It's the worst of both worlds.

It seems to crash about 50% of the time when I attempt to print. I replaced my ancient Lexmark 1020 a year ago with a new, abusive chip-cartridge using Epson (thank you for ingenious Russian hackers) so I doubt it's some obscure conflict there.

Despite the fantastic annotation and highlighting ability, you can't copy/paste any text or images at all. This is taking the DRM too far. Even most protected PDFs allow limited copy/pasting, and information applications like encyclopedias and dictionaries retain limited clipboard use.

Lastly, there is a separate applet that is used to download the magazines. This is actually a nice little applet except closing it doesn't actually close it. Much like AIM, if you hit the little close button in the upper right corner, it's as though you minimized it to the system tray. This is very annoying, and bad UI design. Close means close. Worse, when you then right click the tray icon, and select exit, you must confirm this with a confirmation dialog, and you can't check a "don't ask me again" box like with most other apps.

All in all, it's just bad. I would never purchase a subscription if I had to use this app. If it wasn't for the fact I get this subscription free, I wouldn't use it at all. I don't even bother to read each issue as I get it, viewing them once and month or two, so there's a strong chance I'll never wind up reading all of my free issues, the reader application is so bad. I see no reason why they couldn't have used a straight protected Adobe PDF format instead.
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tellmewhy
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PostPosted: 06/07/2007 04:07:07    Post subject: How to convert ZNO to PDF Reply with quote

There might be problems with the procedure :
(Feed-back found on the internet)

Quote:
How to convert ZNO to PDF :
(This is a work around i found on internet)

  1. Get Adobe Acrobat Professional (Not Reader).
  2. Make sure the Adobe PDF printer is NOT the default printer. This is imperative to the ripping process.
  3. Starting with the first page (cover), hit Ctrl+P in Zinio.
  4. Select Adobe PDF from the printer drop-down menu.
  5. Print the page and save in some sequential order, for example 001.pdf
  6. Repeat for each page (excluding advertisement pages) of the magazine.
  7. Open Adobe Acrobat.
  8. Go to File --> Create PDF --> From Multiple Files…
  9. Click Browse, go to directory where you saved the printed PDFs.
  10. Select all the files (click on the first one, hold down shift and click on the last one)
  11. Make sure files are arranged in order
  12. Create PDF



I tried the above procedure only with the test magazine, that comes with Zinio Reader.
Looks like it doesn't work with .znos from other places, as the reader checks back with Zinios Homepage and won't open the document if no net is present.
So sorry for new hopes that just vanished.
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tellmewhy
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Posts: 2,084

PostPosted: 23/07/2007 04:06:17    Post subject: Converting zno to pdf Reply with quote

Converting zno to pdf

I heard on another forum Holyplanets.com, somebody has created a conversion tool.
Holyplanets wrote:

Someone had created a utility for converting readeable .zno to pdf and it works wonderfully!
It is a very small file and the conversion is almost instant.
Let us all convert our magazines to pdf so as to avoid future Zinio changes.

App:

http://rapidshare.de/files-en/260638/Zinio_To_PDF_Converter.rar.html

Only the given URL on rapidshare doesn't give anything.
Someone knows of this tool ?
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